Teacher Interviews: Why They’re Important

Ace Your Teacher Interview

Ace Your Teacher Interview

The following is an excerpt from the new book Ace Your Teacher Interview, 2nd Ed. written by Anthony D. Fredericks, Blue River Press, 2016.

Here’s a fact of life: Prospective teachers can send out all the resumes, contact all the school districts, and write all the cover letters they want – but they can’t get a teaching position unless they interview. Without the interview there can be no teaching. Do well on the interview and the job is theirs! Do poorly on the interview and, no matter how impressive the credentials may be, no matter how high the G.P.A. is, no matter how stellar the letters of recommendation may be – the simple truth is they’ll never get hired!

When I was in college (and long before I met my wife) my roommate set me up with a blind date. We went to dinner and a movie. It soon became apparent that we had absolutely nothing in common. She was from Texas, I was from California. I grew up surfing, she grew up quilting. I was a long distance runner, she hated sports. I loved Mexican food, she was steak and potatoes. I enjoyed action movies, she preferred romances. I was a liberal, she was a conservative. Conversation was stilted, uncomfortable, and strained. I had her back at her dorm by 9:30 (Imagine!). It was very obvious there would be no second date.

Interviews are like first dates. You are trying to get to know someone. You want to know if this will be a long-term relationship or just a one-night stand. You want to learn as much about each other as you can in the short time available. Your decision to continue the relationship is often based on the “chemistry” that takes place during this initial encounter. A first date and an interview are, quite simply, opportunities to exchange information about each other. Each person wants to know if this is a “match” or if this is a “miss.”

An interview is the one opportunity an applicant has to demonstrate what she or he knows and who they are. That information is not always apparent from the applications, resumes, and letters of recommendation. That information is, however, the crux of a good interview. Successful interviews are all about knowledge and performance – how an applicant presents herself or himself, their responses to questions, and the match between her or his philosophy and that of the school. First and foremost, a school wants to hire a person…a personality…a teacher; not a resume…an application…or a grade point average.

Get your copy of Ace Your Teacher Interview, 2nd Ed. by Anthony D. Fredericks and learn all the “inside information” you need to successfully land a teaching position.

Anthony D. Fredericks, Ed.D

Anthony D. Fredericks, Ed.D

 

 

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